Start Group sex chating wituot

Group sex chating wituot

Slack, first released in 2013, has essentially ushered employer-sanctioned social media into the workplace.

The Slack sell to employers is that it decreases the burden of email, because nobody likes email.

(Whether infinite chatty one-line messages are preferable to an overflowing inbox is debatable; for now, though, Slack retains the advantage of novelty.) It integrates the tools you already use, like Google Drive, so you can easily centralize everything.

Its default color scheme is that of a ’90s mall or movie theater (purple, pink, teal), and if you announce that you’ve completed a task, colleagues can respond with a chorus of custom emoji.

A widely beloved Giphy integration allows users to express themselves via gif.

These functions aren’t so different from those of previous chat apps, but Slack makes them look good (a friendly interface) and run better (speedy, reliable, with a strong search function).

All of this has earned Slack word-of-mouth enthusiasm, not something generally associated with workplace software.

It’s “cool office culture, available for instant download,” Slate declared two years ago, as the phenomenon was taking hold.

Or, as Ali Rayl, Slack’s director of customer experience, puts it (in faintly depressing terms), Slack allows users to “create the human connection without the human overhead.” Slack’s work chat is the consummation of the open-plan-office dream — an unstructured space where you can share, collaborate, and see what everyone else is working on.

Originally, Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield set out to design games.

In 2002, he began work on Game Neverending, an online fantasy video game in which it was impossible for players to win or lose — that project failed, but some of its code gave rise to Flickr.

You can drop in and out of chat channels as the day goes on, or, if you’re a member of a particularly active channel, you might spend all day there, reading through the scroll.